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Statement 6: Expenses and Net Capital Investment

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Part III: Expenses and Net Capital Investment
by Portfolio

Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

Table 5: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 5 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.

Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio contributes to sustainable, competitive and profitable Australian agricultural, fisheries, food and forestry industries.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

Total expenses for the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (AFFA) remain relatively constant across the forward estimates.

The small reduction in administered expenses which occurs between 1999-2000 and 2000-01 is primarily due to the final replacement of the Income Equalisation Deposits scheme with the Farm Management Deposits Scheme and a number of other minor reductions to programme expenses.

Administered expenses increase between 2001-02 and 2002-03, largely as a result of the Agriculture - Advancing Australia Package being extended for four years at a cost of $309 million. The Package's components have been refocused to facilitate change, improve farm skills and expand market opportunities, while retaining essential elements of social welfare. A new programme to encourage farmers to introduce innovative practices and diversify their production will start in 2000-01.

The reduction in departmental expenses over the Budget and forward years reflects the completion of several successful programmes, including Regional Forest Agreements, Supermarket to Asia Strategy and the Food and Fibre Supply Chain Programme. Progressive self-regulation within the meat industry will also reduce expenses within the Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS).

Australian Wool Research and Promotion Organisation

Expenses for the Australian Wool Research and Promotion Organisation (AWRAP) remain relatively stable over the forward years, with small variations between years reflecting patterns of one-off expenditure by the organisation.

Grains Research and Development Corporation

Expenses for the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) reduce marginally over the forward year period as current research projects are progressively completed.

Capital Movements
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

The one-off capital appropriation in 1999-2000 is a capital appropriation of previous years carryover.

The decline in net capital investment between 1999-2000 and 2001-02 is due to the progressive outsourcing of information technology functions. From 2001-02 the movement in net capital investment reflects depreciation, pending the development of an asset replacement strategy.

Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry will purchase special purpose software for AQIS to improve the current border monitoring database systems. This is estimated to amount to $4 million per annum from 2000-01 to 2002-03.

Australian Wool Research and Promotion Organisation

The downward trend in AWRAP's purchases of capital investments over the outyears is mainly due to the reduction in the company's size and subsequent divestment of assets.

Portfolio Overview

The portfolio focuses on industry development strategies, which build stronger and more cooperative relationships along the chain from producer to consumer. To this end, the Agriculture - Advancing Australia Package of programmes encourages self-reliant producers to acquire a strong skills base, as well as a positive attitude to acquiring knowledge and the management of risk.

In the international sphere, the portfolio aims to improve market access, particularly through international trade negotiations and the Supermarket to Asia programme. This is underpinned by a national regulatory service, administered by AQIS and the National Office of Animal and Plant Health and Food Safety, which protect the safety and health of Australia's agricultural, fisheries and forestry industries.

To ensure that Australia's natural resources are available for future generations, the portfolio uses research-driven resource management strategies to ensure that the land and water resource base is sustainably managed, including addressing land degradation and salinity issues.

Material agencies under this portfolio are: the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry; the Australian Wool Research and Promotion Organisation; and the Grains Research and Development Corporation.

Small agencies under this portfolio are: the Australian Dried Fruits Board; the Australian Fisheries Management Authority; the Australian Horticultural Corporation; the Australian Pork Corporation; the Australian Wine and Brandy Corporation; the Cotton Research and Development Corporation; the Dairy Research and Development Corporation; the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation; the Forest and Wood Products Research and Development Corporation; the Grape and Wine Research and Development Corporation; the Horticultural Research and Development Corporation; the Land and Water Resources Development Corporation; the National Registration Authority for Agricultural & Veterinary Chemicals; the Pig Research and Development Corporation; the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation; the Sugar Research and Development Corporation; the Tobacco Research and Development Corporation; and the Wheat Export Authority.

Attorney-General's

Table 6: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 6 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio covers a broad range of legal and judicial services that provide advice to the Government and enhance individual rights. It also promotes the maintenance of law and order, including national security and some aspects of customs and border control.

Trends in Expenses

The major changes in portfolio administered expenses relate largely to the Attorney-General's Department. The major developments in portfolio departmental expenses and resourcing arise from new measures to be implemented by law enforcement agencies and the establishment of the Administrative Review Tribunal (ART).

Attorney-General's Department

The Attorney-General's Department brought forward certain grant commitments to 1998-99 from 1999-2000 (grants to family relationship support organisations and grants to community legal centres) that led to a reduction in administered expenses for 1999-2000. Administered expenses have increased in 2000-01 by some $21 million due to new policy and the deferral of certain expenses from 1999-2000.

The Government will provide increased access to legal assistance to people who are unable to afford the cost of private legal services. The Government will also implement changes to the division of funding between the States and Territories to achieve an equitable distribution of legal aid funding. Additional resources of $63 million, including $46 million over four years from this Budget will be made available to State and Territory Legal Aid Commissions to achieve these initiatives.

In addition, the Attorney-General's Department departmental expenses for 2000-01 include new policy measures of some $13 million. Furthermore, the Family Court of Australia will transfer $3.3 million to the Attorney-General's Department as part of the establishment of the Federal Magistrates Service. The decrease in departmental expenses between 1999-2000 and 2000-01 is largely explained by referendum funding and a 1998-99 departmental carryover in 1999-2000.

The Attorney-General's Department is currently conducting a review of the price of its outputs in conjunction with the Department of Finance and Administration.

Australian Customs Service

Departmental expenses for the Australian Customs Service (ACS) have increased as a result of implementing the Tourist Refund Scheme and monitoring for compliance with GST requirements by importers and exporters under The New Tax System.

In 2000-01, the ACS will enter into a purchaser/provider arrangement with the Australian Taxation Office to fund the ACS for these activities. Under this arrangement, ACS expenses will increase by $43 million in 2000-01 and by a similar amount in future years.

The ACS will also contribute to the package of measures relating to unauthorised arrivals by leasing a charter vessel to transport unauthorised arrivals intercepted at sea or at islands off the mainland.

In addition, the ACS has completed a pricing review that included benchmarking services with similar overseas organisations. These measures are outlined further in Budget Paper No. 2 - Budget Measures 2000-01.

Australian Federal Police

In 2000-01, the Government will continue its Australian civilian police presence in East Timor, which has increased from the first detachment of 50 personnel for a 90-day commitment to replacement detachments of up to 80 personnel for a series of 90-day commitments. The civilian police presence will be deployed as part of the United Nations Transitional Administration for East Timor(UNTAET). Additional resources ($25 million in 2000-01, $26 million in 2001-02, $26 million in 2002-03 and $27 million in 2003-04) will be provided to the Australian Federal Police (AFP) for this measure.

In 1999, the Commonwealth agreed to provide equity funding to enable the AFP to extinguish certain accrued employee entitlements under the AFP Adjustments Scheme (AFPAS). Consequently, the AFP's expenses in 1999-2000 decrease from the recognition of future expenses as a result of the cessation of AFPAS, valued at $43 million and included on the basis of actuarial advice. In addition, over the period 1999-2000 to 2001-02, certain one-off expenses relating principally to the AFP Reform Programme and the Sydney Olympics (amounting to around $105 million) will cease to impact on expenses from 2002-03 onwards.

From 2000-01, the Government will address the growth of unauthorised arrivals by boat and reduce expenses on detention and processing. The AFP will contribute to the Unauthorised Arrivals in Australia package of measures by undertaking joint investigations of organised people smuggling with the Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs (DIMA), establishing an additional overseas liaison officer in Jakarta, and developing a law enforcement cooperation programme between Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Pakistan.

Family Court of Australia

The decrease in expenses takes account of the transfer of some funding to the new Federal Magistrates Service.

Capital Movements
Australian Federal Police

The decline in capital appropriations largely arise from a wind-down in additional equity funding being provided by the Government to the AFP over a three-year period from 1999-2000. This funding is to enable it to extinguish accumulated liabilities of $105 million under the present AFPAS and the Cessation Payment Scheme.

Australian Customs Service

Capital investment is budgeted to decrease for the ACS during 2001-02 to 2003-04 as it completes the purchase of capital assets required for ongoing programmes such as the Tough on Drugs strategy. Further, the marine fleet upgrade replaces a fleet that had already been fully depreciated.

Portfolio Overview

The portfolio covers a broad range of legal and judicial services. These include legal policy; administrative, civil, family and international law; bankruptcy estate administration and regulation; courts and tribunals; legal aid; native title; human rights; criminal law and law enforcement; censorship and the provision of protective services to property and individuals. It also includes national security and some aspects of customs and border control.

The Department and portfolio agencies provide legal policy and services to the Commonwealth, enhance the rights of individuals, and afford the community reasonable access to justice. They promote the implementation of an effective justice system to promote timely adjudication of disputes, as well as the interpretation of the Australian Constitution. They also seek to contribute to the maintenance of law and order, implement effective measures against espionage and subversive activities, and maintain an effective border management policy.

Material agencies under the Attorney-General's portfolio are the Attorney-General's Department; the Australian Customs Service; the Australian Federal Police; and the Family Court of Australia.

Small agencies under the Attorney-General's portfolio are the Administrative Appeals Tribunal; the Australian Institute of Criminology; the Australian Law Reform Commission; the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation; the Australian Transactions Reports and Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC); the Criminology Research Council; the Federal Court of Australia; the High Court of Australia; the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission; the National Crime Authority; the National Native Title Tribunal; the Office of Film and Literature Classification; the Office of Parliamentary Counsel; and the Office of the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions.

Communications, Information Technology and the Arts

Table 7: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 7 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio facilitates a competitive and diverse communications and information technology sector, and encourages the arts and cultural awareness by providing support to various arts organisations.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts

The downward trend in administered expenses over the forward years mainly reflects the conclusion of three Government programmes: Telstra Social Bonus funding; Federation Fund expenditure; and Networking the Nation. The Government is providing additional funding for a number of initiatives over the Budget and forward years, including funding for major performing arts.

The downward trend in departmental expenses over the forward years reflects the conclusion of activities and funding associated with the Telstra Social Bonus and Centenary of Federation.

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

The upward trend in expenses over the forward years largely reflects increased funding for depreciation of digital broadcasting equipment and price indexation, notably for transmission expenses.

Capital Movements
Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts

The increase in the net capital investment for the Department in 1999-2000 and the decrease in 2000-01 reflects the final stages of construction of the National Museum of Australia (NMA). Funding of $128 million has previously been provided to meet the capital cost of the new facility from the Federation Fund. The building will be transferred to the NMA in 2000-01.

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Net capital investment for the ABC is fluctuating over the forward years due to two major influences. Firstly, the Commonwealth will provide the ABC with an equity injection of $37 million over four years to purchase new digital equipment for digital broadcasts. Secondly, the Government is providing the ABC with a $150 million loan facility to assist in the second stage of its relocation to new premises in Ultimo, New South Wales, and to enable the ABC to re-finance on Budget current commercial debt facilities as they mature.

Special Broadcasting Service Corporation

The movements in net capital investment for SBS over the forward years reflect an equity injection of $29 million over four years to purchase new digital equipment for digital broadcasts.

Portfolio Overview

The Commonwealth recognises the importance of a culturally aware society, as well as competitive and sustainable information technology and telecommunications sectors. The Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts is achieving these objectives by encouraging the arts and cultural awareness, providing support to various arts organisations and facilitating a competitive and diverse communications and information technology sector. It is also establishing a secure network to facilitate e-commerce and providing access to government information and services on-line.

The Commonwealth recognises that continuing advances in communications and information technology are fundamentally changing the way Australians live and work. A major objective of the portfolio is to ensure that Australians realise the extraordinary potential of these advances to create jobs and other opportunities.

Major funding and capital initiatives of the portfolio include the Cultural Development Programme and Australia Council initiatives supporting artistic endeavours, and the Federation Fund, which provides infrastructure to support Australia's centenary of federation. It also supports various telecommunications and information technology initiatives that complement the Networking the Nation programme, which is designed to improve access and the quality of service for all Australians, and broadcasting services through the ABC and SBS.

The material agencies under the portfolio are: the Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts; the Australian Broadcasting Corporation; and the Special Broadcasting Service Corporation.

The small agencies under the portfolio are: the Australia Council; the Australian Broadcasting Authority; the Australian Communications Authority; the Australian Film Commission; the Australian Film, Television and Radio School; the Australian National Maritime Museum; the National Archives of Australia; the National Gallery of Australia; the National Library of Australia; and the National Museum of Australia.

Defence

Table 8: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 8 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total. Eliminations for inter-agency transactions within the Defence portfolio are estimated to be around $270 million, reflecting expenses paid to the Defence Housing Authority.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The focus of the portfolio is the prevention or defeat of armed force against Australia or its interests through the development and delivery of a strong military combat capability and the promotion of a favourable regional and global security environment.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Defence

The Government has maintained base-level defence funding in real terms in 2000-01 and over the forward years. The Department has also been provided with increased funding in the 2000-01 Budget and the forward years to address a number of specific funding priorities. From 1999-2000 to 2000-01 Departmental expenses increase by $293 million.

Significantly, increases in departmental expenses relate to the Australian Defence Force's involvement in East Timor. Another major influence results from funding for expenses being shifted from funding for capital investment. In 2001-02, funding for expenses is increased in part by a reallocation of $500 million from the departmental equity injection in accordance with Defence's global funding arrangements. The increase in administered expenses is primarily related to the annual actuarial reassessment of unfunded military superannuation liability.

The Department of Defence has been provided with supplementary funding for its participation in the UN-sponsored peace enforcement and peacekeeping operations in East Timor from September last year. The Appropriation (East Timor) Act 1999-2000 provided for funding for the net additional costs associated with the deployment of up to 6,500 personnel in East Timor in support of Australia's leading nation role in International Force in East Timor (INTERFET), which operated under a peace enforcement mandate from the UN. Estimates (exclusive of capital use charge) of the net additional accrual costs of the East Timor deployment have been revised and adjustments made to the funding in all years (revised estimates are: $731 million in 1999-2000; $922 million in 2000-01; $736 million in 2001-02; $669 million in 2002-03 and $675 million in 2003-04).

Australian forces were scaled back to 2,200 personnel earlier this year with the peacekeeping operation now under the auspices of the United Nations Transitional Authority for East Timor (UNTAET). The permanent commitment will be around 1550 troops.

Australia bore the full responsibility for funding its own involvement in INTERFET and also incurred some costs on behalf of other INTERFET contributing nations. With the transition to a UN peacekeeping operation. UN reimbursements to Australia are expected to amount to $372 million over the next four years.

The Department has also been granted additional funding of $20 million in 2000-01 to extend the operational capability of the Reserves through initiatives to enhance the Reservists' role and support their employers.

Certain properties will be leased back as a result of a programme of Defence property sales agreed by Government. Defence will receive rental supplementation in respect of the commercial rental rates charged for some selected properties ($20 million in 2001-02, $21 million in 2002-03 and $21 million in 2003-04).

Military superannuation expense estimates are affected by annual actuarial assessments. The current actuarial assessment of superannuation resulted in increases in estimated superannuation expenses in future years, significantly in 2003-04 ($155 million).

Defence Housing Authority

The increase in expenses over the four years is mainly due to increases in rental payments to private sector property investors associated with the Authority's sale and leaseback programme for housing. There is also an increase in interest expenses associated with increasing debt levels as DHA moves to a more commercial capital structure.

Defence purchases housing services from the DHA which, in line with the 1998 review of DHA, is being restructured on a more commercial basis. The Department of Defence is being supplemented by around $69 million per annum in the 2000-01 Budget for increased costs associated with the adoption of more commercial practices by the DHA. These costs will be budget neutral, as increased dividends and taxes will result from the increased revenues to DHA.

Capital Movements
Department of Defence

The Defence capital budget is financed from within an overall budget for Defence. This global budget covers both recurrent and capital requirements and reflects the Government's commitment to no real change in Defence spending over the period 2000-01 to 2001-02. Total capital expenditure in 2000-01 is expected to be $3.3 billion and includes initiatives to progress the policy of enhancing capabilities across the priority areas of the knowledge edge, defeating air and maritime threats, and strike and land forces.

The capital appropriation represents the additional contribution to Defence by the Commonwealth as owner. Within Defence's global flexibilities, the injection can be used for any purpose that increases the net assets of Defence. The injection is not tied to any specific capital projects.

The Government has agreed to a programme of Defence property sales. Over four years $541 million will be returned to the Budget and Defence will retain $324 million from other sales to help offset budgetary pressures. This is in addition to the usual ongoing asset sales programme undertaken by Defence.

The Government will provide an additional capital appropriation of $208 million in 2000-01 for high-priority projects in Defence. An amount of $128 million is for the enhancement of two Collins Class submarines. The remainder is to be provided for other key activities, such as $40 million for the remediation of Reserve unit equipment that was used in East Timor and $40 million to support the introduction of new corporate and information management systems.

Defence Housing Authority

The initial decreases in net capital investment in years 1999-2000 to 2001-02 are due to the DHA's divestment of properties through a sale and leaseback programme. In the forward years, DHA will increase its stock of directly owned properties in order to meet the expected housing needs of Defence.

Portfolio Overview

Apart from its primary outcomes outlined above, the portfolio also delivers non-combat related services, such as search and rescue, to support the community in times of need. These services are made possible by using the capabilities that have been developed primarily for the defence of Australia.

Material agencies under the portfolio are: the Department of Defence; and the Defence Housing Authority.

Education, Training and Youth Affairs

Table 9: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 9 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The Commonwealth is seeking to create a flexible education and training system that is available to all Australians. It aims to provide students with foundation skills by providing funding for general recurrent and capital grants for government and non-government schools. The Government also provides funding to higher education institutions and assists providers in the vocational education and training sector to help individuals achieve relevant skills and learning outcomes for work and life.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs

Total expenses for DETYA in 2000-01 are estimated to be $11.6 billion, an increase of 3.4 per cent on 1999-2000. The main driver of this change is the schools sector.

The Commonwealth's contribution to schools in 2000-01 is estimated to be $5.2 billion, increasing by 7 per cent from $4.8 billion in 1999-2000. This reflects increases in per capita costs and rising enrolments. An amount of $4.4 billion will be provided to government and non-government schools and school systems in the form of general recurrent and capital grants. Additionally, $700 million will be provided for specific programmes targeted at improving participation and educational attainment for Indigenous students and other groups requiring support.

The Commonwealth's contribution to higher education in 2000-01 is estimated to be $4.4 billion. This funding consists of Commonwealth subsidies to capital and recurrent costs through grants to universities. This includes $461 million to higher education research and research training. This maintains real levels of funding.

Estimated total higher education sector income is higher than ever before at over $9 billion. This represents Commonwealth grants, the HECS, State contributions, fees and charges levied by institutions, investment income, as well as income from other sources, including research contracts and consultancies.

The Commonwealth will contribute funding of $1.7 billion to the vocational education and training sector, including funding for youth programmes. This maintains real levels of funding. The bulk of this funding is directed through the Australian National Training Authority (ANTA) (almost $950 million) and funding for New Apprenticeships ($474 million), including New Apprenticeship Centres (NACs).

The Budget sees a number of new measures and endorsement of continued funding for lapsing programmes, each of which contributes positively to achieving the Government's national priorities for the portfolio. These are outlined in Budget Paper No. 2 - Budget Measures 2000-01.

Capital Movements

The Commonwealth funds HECS loans on behalf of students of higher education institutions, which are treated for accounting purposes as capital funding. The significant increase in capital appropriations from 1999-2000 to 2000-01 is a result of indexation of the total HECS debt. The gradual decline over the forward years is a result of increasing HECS debt repayments by students, which reduces the level of capital appropriation.

Portfolio Overview

The Commonwealth is seeking to create a flexible education and training system that is available to all Australians.

The Government aims to provide students with foundation skills by funding government and non-government schools. It also provides funding to assist students with special learning needs, including initiatives which introduce literacy and numeracy standards; educate Indigenous students; recognise the needs of students in rural and remote areas; assist students with language backgrounds other than English; and provide special education for students with disabilities. Funding is also available to address issues such as drugs in schools, quality schooling and curriculum development and to increase student participation in the study of targeted languages.

The Government provides funding to higher education institutions in order to support an independent and internationally competitive approach to teaching, research and scholarship. Australians' access to higher education is supported by the Commonwealth's grants to universities.

The Government seeks to assist providers in the vocational education sector by funding New Apprenticeships and contributing to ANTA. The Government also assists the transition of people into the workforce by organising training courses for those without sufficient literacy, numeracy and English language skills, as well as a number of transitional strategies such as career counselling and pathway programmes. In addition, key administered items such as Green Corps and programmes that assist young people with the transition from school to work encourage young Australians to contribute actively to the community.

Material agencies in the portfolio: the Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs.

Small agencies in the portfolio: the Australian National Training Authority.

Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business

Table 10: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 10 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business portfolio facilitates the efficient and equitable performance of the labour market and the promotion of an improved operating environment for small business. It aims to increase employment growth through initiatives that improve labour market performance, and encourages more flexible and fair workplace relations.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business

Administered expenses are estimated to increase in 2000-01 due to the expansion of targeted employment assistance in support of the most disadvantaged job seekers and the expansion of other labour market programmes.

Budget measures to implement the Employee Entitlements Support Scheme and the Dairy Regional Assistance Programme have increased the administered expenses in 2000-01, 2001-02 and 2002-03 for the Department of Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business (DEWRSB).

The increase in expenses for Comcare largely reflects the net movement in outstanding liabilities for workers' compensation claims, calculated by an actuary using factors such as age profiles, claims duration and frequency.

Capital Movements

The one-off capital appropriation in 1999-2000 was for administered and departmental carryovers from 1998-99.

Portfolio Overview

DEWRSB contributes to improved labour market performance and more flexible and fair workplace relations through policy advice, legislation development, programme administration, research and education. The Department is a major purchaser of employment services through Job Network and Centrelink.

The Department also administers a range of employment programmes to support the principle of mutual obligation and to promote employment initiatives at the regional level and for specific target groups, including Indigenous Australians. It plays a major role in developing the Government's workplace relations initiatives, including Australian Workplace Agreements. The Department also administers the International Labour Organisation membership subscription, and financing arrangements under the Coal Mining Industry (Long Service Leave) Act 1922.

The Department promotes an improved operating environment for small business by advising on policy, building effective links with small business and its representative organisations, and managing financial assistance programmes for small business.

The Department also improves access to government information and services via the Internet.

The Australian Industrial Relations Commission contributes to cooperative workplace relations by maintaining an effective award safety net and maintaining processes that facilitate agreement making. The Commission also provides conciliation and arbitration for employers, employees and their representatives, and ensures that workplace organisations are representative and accountable to members.

The Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency implements legislative requirements under the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Act 1999, as well as promoting best practice affirmative action policies.

The National Occupational Health and Safety Commission assists governments to improve the health and safety of work environments.

Comcare and the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Commission deliver occupational health and safety and workers' compensation for Commonwealth employees.

Material agencies under the portfolio are: the Department of Employment, Workplace Relations and Small Business; and Comcare.

Small agencies under the portfolio are: the Australian Industrial Relations Commission and Australian Industrial Registry; the Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency; and the National Occupational Health and Safety Commission.

Environment and Heritage

Table 11: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 11 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio serves to protect the environment and heritage, deliver meteorological and related science services to Australia and advance Australia's interests in Antarctica.

Trends in Expenses

The change in administered expenses over the Budget and forward years largely reflects the introduction of the Product Stewardship Arrangements for Waste Oil measure ($25 million) and the expenditure profiles of the Natural Heritage Trust (NHT) and the Federation Fund. The NHT has a commitment of $1.5 billion over six years (1996-97 to 2001-02), of which $1.35 billion was provided from the partial sale of Telstra.

The increase in departmental expenses between 1999-2000 and 2000-01 reflects the introduction of the A New Tax System - Measures for a Better Environment package ($100 million over the four years 2000-01 to 2003-04). The reduction in expenses after 2001-02 reflects the finalisation of the Living Cities and Oceans Policy programmes in that year.

The Government is maintaining its commitment to environmental issues by providing $896 million over the four years 2000-01 to 2003-04 from the A New Tax System - Measures for a Better Environment package. This funding was appropriated through the Appropriations (Supplementary Measures) Act (No.2) 1999 on 11 November 1999. The package comprises a range of initiatives, including greenhouse gas abatement, oil recycling, renewable remote power generation and renewable energy programmes.

The Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH) has completed stage one of a pricing review. This is outlined further in Budget Paper No. 2 - Budget Measures 2000-01.

Table 11 does not include expenses for the Australian Greenhouse Office, which is currently a small agency, but will receive funding of $796 million over the period 2000-01 to 2003-04 from the A New Tax System - Measures for a Better Environment package and will therefore be shown as a material agency in future budget papers.

Capital Movements

The decrease in net capital investment in 2000-01 largely reflects asset sales by the Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology (BoM). The fluctuations over the forward years are the result of the Australian Antarctic Division's cyclical asset replacement programme. One-off capital appropriations in 1999-2000 reflect an appropriation of previous years carryovers and an equity injection for the Director of National Parks.

Portfolio Overview

The DEH implements policies and programmes for the protection of the environment. It also directs research on the Antarctic, including the region's role in the global climate system.

The NHT, jointly administered by AFFA, provides a framework to stimulate investment in the natural environment. The Department also administers a number of grant programmes, including the Cultural Heritage Projects Programme, Grants to Voluntary Environment and Heritage Organisations and the Australian Biological Resources Study Participatory Programme.

The Bureau of Meteorology is responsible for the provision of meteorological and related hydrological and oceanographic services.

The Australian Greenhouse Office is the leading Commonwealth agency on greenhouse matters and is responsible for the coordination of domestic climate change policy and managing the delivery of Commonwealth greenhouse programmes.

The National Oceans Office was established as an executive agency within the Department in December 1999. The Office will coordinate implementation of Australia's Ocean Policy and the Regional Marine Plan and will act as the main administrative coordination point between the Commonwealth, States and Territories on oceans policy issues.

The Australian Heritage Commission is responsible for conserving the National Estate, which consists of those places that are part of Australia's natural or cultural environment.

The Director of National Parks administers the Commonwealth National Parks, reserves and conservation zones.

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority is responsible for the care and development of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

Material agencies under the portfolio: the Department of the Environment and Heritage.

Small agencies under the portfolio are: the Australian Greenhouse Office; the Australian Heritage Commission; the Director of National Parks; the National Oceans Office; and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority.

Family and Community Services

Table 12: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 12 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total. Eliminations for inter-agency transaction within the Family and Community Services portfolio are estimated to be $1.7 billion, reflecting expenses paid to Centrelink.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The Department of Family and Community Services develops policies that address the income support needs of individuals. It also provides family relationship services, welfare housing and financial support and other services for people with disabilities and families with children.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Family and Community Services

The increase in expenses between 1999-2000 and 2003-04 is due to The New Tax System compensation in 2000-01, and to indexation and the ageing of the population that, together, increase both the number of clients and the average rates of payment.

The increase in administered expenses in the Department of Family and Community services in 2000-01 is largely due to increases in the rates of Family Assistance paid as a consequence of the introduction of The New Tax System.

The Age Pension and the Disability Support Pension are subject to significant growth, both because of the ageing of the population and because of indexation.

Significant growth is also anticipated with payments to sole parents, both because of anticipated increased numbers and because of indexation.

Funding of $15 billion in 2000-01, rising to $16 billion by 2003-04, will be provided in direct financial support for families, children and youth. The financial support is through the Family Assistance, Youth and Student Support, and Child Support programmes.

Funding of $1.4 billion in 2000-01 will be provided to support and strengthen communities. This commitment will be delivered through a combination of services and community-based programmes. Activities include housing, supported accommodation assistance, rural and regionally focused programmes, and emergency relief.

Income support is provided for those requiring it due to age, disability, unemployment and carer responsibilities. Funding of $38 billion in 2000-01, rising to $41 billion by 2003-04, will provide programmes that encourage self-reliance and economic independence for all Australians while maintaining a highly targeted, comprehensive and affordable safety net for those people who are in need of assistance.

Expenses will rise to $60.4 billion in 2003-04, largely because of indexation of pensions and the ageing of the population.

The Department has completed a pricing review that included benchmarking services with similar organisations. This is outlined further in Budget Paper No. 2 - Budget Measures 2000-01.

Centrelink

Centrelink is implementing a strategy to increase its efficiency, thereby reducing expenses over the next four years.

Capital Movements
Department of Family and Community Services

The majority of capital appropriations relate to the Student Financial Supplement Scheme, which is administered by the Commonwealth Bank. Funding is required to purchase maturing student loans from the Bank, with the loans being repaid by students in instalments through the taxation system.

Variations in net capital investment relate to timing of capital investments and associated asset replacement strategy.

Centrelink

Centrelink is budgeting for capital expenditure of $98 million in 2000-01, $103 million in 2001-02, $81 million in 2002-03 and $70 million in 2003-04. This expenditure is to fund software and office fit-out required to support Centrelink's ongoing service delivery.

This capital investment will be partly funded by equity injections of $19 million in 2000-01, $8 million in 2001-02, $8 million in both 2002-03 and 2003-04. The Government is providing these equity injections for the implementation of The New Tax System, and the Revised Means Test Treatment of Private Trusts and Private Companies.

Portfolio Overview

The portfolio comprises a number of agencies and a department. Centrelink is the principal service delivery organisation for income support payments, delivering information, products and services to the Australian community.

The Australian Institute of Family Studies researches factors affecting family stability. It also provides a national information centre on these issues.

The portfolio has several broad objectives. The first is to strengthen families by ensuring that they have access to financial assistance and support, mainly through the Family Assistance, Youth and Student Support and Child Support programmes. It also strives to strengthen communities through access to affordable housing, community support services and assistance to those in need.

The portfolio aims to deliver a combination of services and community-based programmes that encourage partnerships between government, the community and the business sector. Activities include Supported Accommodation Assistance, rural and regionally focused programmes and disaster relief.

The portfolio also provides income support for those requiring it due to age, disability, unemployment and carer responsibilities. It seeks to facilitate participation in the labour force through services that encourage independence and contribution to the community. It provides programmes that encourage self-reliance and economic independence while maintaining a highly targeted and affordable safety net for those who are genuinely in need of assistance.

Material agencies under this portfolio are: the Department of Family and Community Services; and Centrelink.

Small agencies under this portfolio: the Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Finance and Administration

Table 13: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 13 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio advises the Government on the management of Commonwealth resources and delivers whole-of-government services to Commonwealth departments and agencies.

The Department of Finance and Administration (DOFA) contributes to the implementation of the Government's reform strategy for the public sector by emphasising improvements to management and introducing government services to competition.

The sales and outsourcing activities of the portfolio help to confine the direct activities of the Commonwealth to those matters that are most appropriate and cost effective, while enhancing industry development, competitiveness and structural efficiency.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Finance and Administration

The reduction in administered expenses under Commonwealth superannuation schemes between 1999-2000 and 2000-01 largely reflects a one-off effect on expenses in 1999-2000 arising from the revaluation of the superannuation liability. Given that the Commonwealth Superannuation Schemes are unfunded, agency employer superannuation contributions are currently returned to the budget. With the expected payment of employer contributions to the private sector superannuation schemes associated with the planned closure of the PSS, this will reduce expenses (and associated revenue) after 2000-01. The estimates assume that the scheme will be closed from 1 July 2001 pending a Government decision on a new closure date.

DOFA's departmental expenses reduce between 1999-2000 and 2000-01. This is largely a result of the sale of a departmental business activity (Removals Australia) and changes in arrangements for the management of Commonwealth property.

Australian Electoral Commission

Trends in departmental expenses for the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) reflect the cyclical nature of its activities. The peaks in estimates in 1999-2000 and 2001-02 reflect the timing of the referendum held in November 1999 and the normal Federal election cycle.

The estimated administered expenses in 2001-02 represent election funding provided to candidates.

Office of Asset Sales and Information Technology Outsourcing

The peak expenses in 1999-2000 reflect increased activity for a number of sales within the asset sales programme, including the finalisation of the Telstra 2 sales programme. The decline in expenses reflects the budgeting arrangements whereby Office of Asset Sales and Information Technology Outsourcing funding on the asset sales activity is determined annually.

Capital Movements
Department of Finance and Administration

The movement in net capital investment by DOFA across most years reflects the planned sales of properties from the Commonwealth's estate managed by the department and the fall in the value of vehicles under the DASFleet finance lease.

The capital appropriation primarily funds the pay-out of superannuation liabilities in respect of an individuals own contributions and employer productivity contributions as Commonwealth employees resign or retire. Other capital appropriations are to enable the construction and refurbishment of the Commonwealth's property estate and the provision of capital support to Employment National.

Portfolio Overview

DOFA assists the Commonwealth to achieve sustainable finances through managing the Budget, advising on agency performance, providing shareholder advice to Ministers and advising on strategic budget policy issues. It also delivers whole-of-government services to Commonwealth departments and agencies, including managing Commonwealth property, providing policy advice on Commonwealth superannuation arrangements and administering Comcover (the Commonwealth's Insurable Risk Managed Fund).

The Department facilitates public access to government information in order to allow greater understanding of government activities and better quality of service delivery. The Department also provides advice and services to Ministers and present and former parliamentarians.

AEC also provides Australians with an equitable and independent electoral service by maintaining the Commonwealth electoral roll and providing electoral information programmes. The AEC also provides international electoral assistance.

OASITO arranges the sale of major Commonwealth assets. It also arranges the outsourcing of information technology services for Commonwealth departments and agencies and assists agencies to implement the outsourcing of other activities through competitive tendering and contracting.

Material agencies under the portfolio are: the Department of Finance and Administration; the Australian Electoral Commission; and the Office of Asset Sales and Information Technology Outsourcing.

Small agencies under the portfolio are: the Commonwealth Grants Commission; and the Commonwealth Superannuation Administration (ComSuper).

Foreign Affairs and Trade

Table 14: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 14 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio conducts Australia's foreign relations, assists Australians to win export business, generates investment, and provides assistance to developing countries. The portfolio also provides consular and passport services for Australians.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade's (DFAT) expenses across the forward estimates remain relatively constant, altering in future years largely due to the effect of variations in price and wage indices. DFAT's expenses for its core diplomatic function remain relatively unchanged at approximately $608 million per annum (including $103 million per annum for payments to the UN). Expenses for the consular and passport function will remain relatively constant at approximately $136 million per annum, with the Government allocating additional resources across the forward years to ensure that services do not decline in the face of dramatic increases in demand.

The main movement in DFAT's departmental expenses between 1999-2000 and 2000-01 relates to the return of $20 million to the Budget of foreign exchange supplementation not utilised. Foreign exchange arrangements are currently under review.

The Commonwealth will provide additional resources to maintain the current level of high-quality passport and consular services in the wake of a pricing review undertaken by DFAT and the Department of Finance and Administration. The review found that the demand for consular services is expected to increase significantly in coming years, largely due to increasing numbers of Australians travelling abroad. The number of Australians travelling overseas is estimated to increase by 700,000 over the next four years.

Australia will provide $103 million per annum, an increase of $7 million on 1999-2000, to various organisations under the UN umbrella, such as UN Transitional Administration in East Timor, Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organisation, UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation and various UN peacekeeping and observation operations.

AusAID

A high priority in this budget is the foreign policy challenge created by developments in East Timor. In response, the Commonwealth will provide $150 million in aid to East Timor over four years, $100 million of which is additional funding, with the remainder drawn from the existing global aid budget. This assistance will focus on long-term development activities.

AusAID's expenses on the delivery of aid to developing countries in cash terms remain relatively constant across the forward estimates period, however, the accrual statements indicate that expenses will increase by $269 million in 2000-01.

The fluctuations in AusAID's expenses are due to the full expensing of contributions to a range of multi-year agreements in the year the commitments are made, for example, contributions to the World Bank - International Development Association and the Asian Development Fund. While cash payments made to these organisations remain constant, accrual statements will vary substantially between each year.

Australian Trade Commission

Encouraging trade and investment between Australia and foreign countries ($173 million per annum) and providing financial and other assistance to Australian exporters ($150 million per annum) comprise the majority of Austrade's expenses.

Austrade's departmental expenses remain constant over the forward estimates period.

Financial support provided to eligible Australian companies under the Export Market Development Grants Scheme ($150 million per annum) contributes to Australia's trade performance. This programme was previously extended until the 2001-02 financial year. A review of this scheme is currently underway.

Capital Movements
Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Currently DFAT has budgeted for negative net capital investment in the budget and forward years, pending the outcome of a review of its medium-term asset replacement strategy. The development of long-term asset replacement strategies is one of the key features of the improvements arising from accrual budgeting.

AusAID

Through a series of capital appropriations, the Government is providing AusAID with a capital injection of approximately $800 million over four years to extinguish liabilities to the Asia Development Fund, the International Development Association (World Bank), the International Fund for Agriculture Development, the Global Environment Fund and the Nauru Treaty.

Portfolio Overview

As well as conducting Australia's foreign relations, the portfolio focuses on several key objectives, notably the implementation of international agreements covering weapons of mass destruction and the advancement of Australian interests on the international environment agenda. It also vigorously pursues policies that enhance global market access and promote international trade liberalisation, notably working with international organisations such as the World Trade Organisation and Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation.

Assistance provided to countries affected by the Asian crisis is helping them to respond to social needs, resume sustained growth and improve their economic and financial management. Substantial development assistance is also provided to Papua New Guinea. Through its contribution to the Bougainville peace and reconstruction process, the portfolio is working for a settlement to the dispute on the island.

The reconstruction in East Timor is also a key focus, as well as the promotion of stability and economic reform in the Pacific Island countries. Australia will also continue to respond to emergency and humanitarian situations.

Material agencies under the portfolio are: the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID); and the Australian Trade Commission (Austrade).

Small agencies under the portfolio are: the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research; the Australian Secret Intelligence Service, and the Australia-Japan Foundation.

Health and Aged Care

Table 15: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 15 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total. Eliminations for inter-agency transactions within the Health and Aged Care portfolio are around $12 billion, reflecting grants paid to the Health Insurance Commission.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio aims to ensure that world class health and aged care services are available to all Australians.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Health and Aged Care

The expected growth in portfolio expenses from 1999-2000 to 2003-04 reflects the steadily increasing costs of providing access to Medicare, especially for medical benefits, pharmaceutical benefits and hospital funding. Increasing utilisation of services and drugs, a drift to newer and more costly services and drugs, and population growth, mainly drive this growth. Growth also results from Government decisions to increase funding in key areas such as hospital services, regional health and health research.

Of the approximately $6 billion in growth of expenses from 1999-2000 to 2003-04, the main components are Medical Services and Benefits ($2 billion), Hospital Services and Health Care Agreements ($1.5 billion), Pharmaceutical Services and Benefits ($1.1 billion) and Aged Care ($1.2 billion).

For the 2000-01 Budget, the key priority for the Health and Aged Care portfolio is ameliorating the difficulties faced by rural and remote Australians in accessing health and aged care services. The Budget introduces an integrated package of measures, the Regional Health Package - More Doctors, Better Services, directed at improving access to rural health and aged care services in the near term, with initiatives to ensure the long-term sustainability of that access, at a cost of $562 million over the coming four years.

In addition, improving access to high quality health and aged care services for all Australians, while ensuring the financial sustainability of the Medicare and Pharmaceutical Benefits Schemes, remains a key portfolio priority. Additional initiatives designed to address quality improvements in health care will also be implemented from 2000-01, and these are outlined in Budget Paper No. 2 - Budget Measures 2000-01.

Health Insurance Commission

Trends in expenses for the Health Insurance Commission primarily reflect the flow of medical and pharmaceutical benefits, as described above.

Capital Movements
Department of Health and Aged Care

The Department of Health and Aged Care (DHAC) has planned capital acquisitions for an office fit-out of $14 million in 2000-01 and $11 million in each of the forward years. In addition, the Government will provide DHAC with a loan of $11 million to fund the replacement of corporate information systems.

The decrease in net capital investment in the forward years is due to the outsourcing of the IT function and sale proceeds associated with this programme.

The Government will provide capital appropriations of $168 million over the Budget and forward years to extinguish outstanding liabilities relating to grant payments.

Health Insurance Commission

The increase in the Health Insurance Commission's net capital investment in 2000-01 is the result of the capitalisation of software previously accounted for as work in progress. The level of capital investment remains steady in the forward years taking into consideration amortisation of software.

Portfolio Overview

The portfolio delivers a diverse set of activities, all focused on achieving Health and Aged Care outcomes. These include national leadership and coordination in population health and safety activities, ensuring access, through Medicare, to high quality primary care, medicines, and (in cooperation with the States and Territories) hospital services, implementing measures to encourage the take-up of private health insurance, and providing subsidies for residents of aged care facilities based on their care needs.

In addition, the portfolio develops and supports strategies to improve the quality and effectiveness of health care, ensures a coordinated approach to the delivery of health care in rural and remote locations and funds a range of hearing services to eligible people. Further, funding is provided for primary and specialist health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and for research and training in health, including through funding to the National Health and Medical Research Council.

Material agencies under this portfolio are: the Department of Health and Aged Care; and the Health Insurance Commission.

Small agencies under this portfolio are: the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency; the Australia New Zealand Food Authority; the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare; the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Authority; the Private Health Insurance Administration Council; the Private Health Insurance Ombudsman; and the Professional Services Review Scheme.

Immigration and Multicultural Affairs

Table 16: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 16 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio contributes to Australia's economic, social and international interests through programmes that manage the lawful entry of people into Australia. It also seeks to promote a society that values Australian citizenship, appreciates cultural diversity and enables immigrants to participate equitably.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs

Increases in expenses from 1999-2000 primarily reflect the costs associated with the significant increase in unauthorised arrivals by boat. In the period June 1999 to March 2000, more than 3,500 unauthorised arrivals by boat entered Australia, compared with a total of 3,100 in the five years to June 1999. Expenses on reception, detention and processing for unauthorised arrivals are estimated to rise by nearly $140 million during 1999-2000. Based on current patterns, total expenses are expected to increase to at least $240 million per annum in later years.

The increased departmental expenses also reflect measures adopted in response to the report prepared by Departmental Secretaries, Unauthorised Arrivals in Australia, and the Prime Minister's Coastal Surveillance Taskforce, which provided around $30 million per annum in additional resources to the Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs (DIMA) for the extension of the coverage and the intensity of Coastwatch's aerial surveillance and DIMA's offshore compliance activity.

Following a request from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the Government activated plans on 1 May 1999 to provide temporary safehaven to 4,000 displaced persons from the Kosovo region of the Former Republic of Yugoslavia. The full cost of providing a safehaven to the displaced Kosovars is expected to be almost $100 million, primarily in 1999-2000. Nearly $50 million of these expenses will be incurred in DIMA.

In response to a further request from the UNHCR, the Government also provided a safehaven for nearly 2,000 internally-displaced persons from East Timor. The total cost of providing a safehaven to the East Timorese is expected to be around $40 million, primarily in 1999-2000, with some $20 million of these expenses to be incurred by DIMA.

Estimates of DIMA's departmental expenses from 2000-01 onwards also reflect the Government's decision to amalgamate the Refugee Review Tribunal (RRT) and the Migration Review Tribunal (MRT) within the new Administrative Review Tribunal to be established from February 2001. The expenses for merits review of migration decisions will then be incurred by the Attorney-General's portfolio, with DIMA to be allocated the resources currently provided to the RRT and the MRT for the purchase of review services on a cost-recovery basis.

The administered expenses of the Department are primarily provided for language and settlement services provided to support immigrants in the community. The increases in administered expenses since the 1999-2000 Budget reflect increased expenses expected under the Adult Migrant English Programme and the provision of safe havens to the displaced Kosovars and East Timorese.

Capital Movements
Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs

The change in net capital investment in 1999-2000 and 2000-01 primarily reflects the investment required to expand detention facilities in line with the increase in unauthorised arrivals. During 1999-2000, DIMA invested in the establishment of temporary detention facilities at Woomera in South Australia and Curtin in Western Australia. In 2000-01 the Government will provide a $3 million equity injection for the capital costs of establishing a new immigration detention facility in the Darwin region.

DIMA will internally fund around $30 million during 2001-02 and 2002-03 in the continued development of its Integrated Client Service Environment, which aims to replace 10 separate service-orientated computer systems. DIMA's capital replacement strategy for 2003-04 is currently under consideration.

The capital appropriations primarily relate to the provision of resourcing under the workload agreement between DIMA and DOFA. Adjustments to funding arising from workload changes after the preparation of the Additional Estimates bills are appropriated as a capital item in the budget of the following year.

Portfolio Overview

DIMA manages the entry and stay of people in Australia. DIMA is also responsible for the enforcement of immigration law through the prevention, detection and removal of unlawful entrants.

To enable immigrants to participate equitably in Australian society DIMA also provides settlement, translating and interpreting services. In particular, the Adult Migrant English Programme is an integral support element for immigrants and refugees to ensure that they have the capacity to communicate effectively.

DIMA promotes the value of Australian citizenship and cultural diversity through sponsoring activities such as the celebration of the 50th anniversary of Australian citizenship in 1999 and the Living in Harmony campaign.

The portfolio also ensures that decisions on the migration and refugee status of applicants are fair and balanced by providing independent merit reviews through the MRT and the RRT. The RRT also contributes to ensuring that Australia meets its obligations under international conventions relating to the status of refugees. These roles will be taken over by the Immigration Review Division of the new ART, which is to be established from February 2001. The resourcing for the merits review of migration decisions will be provided through DIMA for the purchase of review services from the ART.

The portfolio has also coordinated the implementation of the Government's humanitarian offer to provide temporary safehaven to displaced people from Kosovo and East Timor. Operation Safehaven drew upon the resources of agencies within the Defence and Health and Aged Care portfolios and a number of State and Territory Governments.

The material agency in this portfolio is the Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs.

Small agencies in the portfolio are: the Migration Review Tribunal and the Refugee Review Tribunal.

Industry, Science and Resources

Table 17: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 17 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio develops and administers policies and programmes that aim to benefit Australians and Australian industries. It promotes activities that increase the international competitiveness of industries and develops Australia's innovative, scientific and technological capability. It also encourages excellence in sports performance and participation.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Industry, Science and Resources

Estimated expenses for the Department of Industry Science and Resources (DISR) decline over the Budget and forward years, predominantly due to the effect of recent sharp increases in world oil prices. These rises have resulted in a significant increase in offshore petroleum royalties and consequential payments to the Western Australian Government. For estimates purposes it has been assumed that oil prices will fall back over the forward years. Consequently, estimated payments to Western Australia for their share of the royalties are estimated to be $340 million in 1999-2000, $221 million in 2000-01 and around $180 million in the remaining forward years.

In response to increases in the number and quality of proposals for commercialisation of research and development coming forward under the Industry Innovation Programme, expense estimates have been brought forward for assistance provided to small and medium enterprises. Expenses are now in the order of $155 million per annum and are estimated to decline to around $80 million by 2003-04.

Expenditure on other major programmes are expected to increase over the forward years:

DISR's departmental expenses are estimated to remain broadly unchanged over the Budget and forward years. An increase of $27 million between 2001-02 and 2003-04 for the National Biotechnology Strategy will be partially offset by a reduction in the price of outputs following the pricing review conducted in 1999-2000.

Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation

The expense pattern in the forward years rises slightly. While there are several small influences contributing to this trend, it mainly reflects price rises and the continuation of long-term trends associated with the demand for its services.

Australian Sports Commission

Following a spike in estimated expenditure due to the provision of funding for the Olympic Athletes' Programme, which provides funding to assist elite athletes in their preparations for the 2000 Olympics and Paralympics, expenses are estimated to increase slightly in the outyears.

Australian Tourist Commission

The $15 million reduction in estimated expenses from 2002-03 reflects the cessation of the Australian Tourist Commission's current four-year $42 million marketing and promotions campaign.

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

The increase in estimated expenses for the CSIRO is mainly attributable to two factors. To ensure that the sale and leaseback of six properties does not adversely affect the level of research, the Government has agreed to supplement CSIRO's base funding for the cost of the sales, rent and other net ongoing property costs. Additionally, expenses are trending slightly upwards in line with predicted increases in non-appropriation revenue for research and scientific activities.

Capital Movements
Department of Industry, Science and Resources

Capital appropriations to DISR largely reflect the purchase of gas to liquids technology in 1999-2000. Also, 1999-2000 includes a loan to Australian Leather Holdings Pty Ltd ($14 million). The balance of movements is explained by the fluctuations in investments and loans under various administered programmes.

Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation

The increase in net capital investment by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation is due to the provision by the Government of a capital appropriation of $326 million over nine years to fund the construction of a replacement research reactor at Lucas Heights.

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

In addition to normal investment on research plant and equipment, CSIRO's capital investment will be significantly higher in 2000-01 due to the completion of three major building projects - North Ryde NSW ($30 million), Pinjarra Hills Queensland ($23 million), and Bentley Western Australia ($38 million).

CSIRO's property portfolio and property management was independently reviewed in the context of the Commonwealth's Property Principles. Following the review, sales are expected to return $107 million over the forward estimates period. ($23 million in 2000-01, $31 million in 2001-02 and $54 million in 2002-03).

Portfolio Overview

DISR delivers a range of programmes, including assistance to the pharmaceutical industry, the Technology Diffusion Programme, R&D Start, Cooperative Research Centres, the Innovation Investment Fund and other industrial programmes. The Department also provides scientific business services through the Australian Surveying and Land Information Group and the Australian Government Analytical Laboratories.

The portfolio includes three science research agencies - the Australian Institute of Marine Science, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation. It also supports a scientific business service agency, the Australian Geological Survey Organisation.

The National Standards Commission promotes the international competitiveness of Australian industry by coordinating a national system of physical measurements.

The Australian Tourist Commission promotes Australia as a holiday destination overseas, while also protecting Australia from adverse impacts of international tourism.

IP Australia seeks to ensure that Australians benefit from intellectual property by granting patents, trademarks and designs.

The Australian Sports Commission develops programmes that deliver a national sports infrastructure, improved participation and excellence in sports performance. The Australian Sports Drug Agency aims to deter athletes from contravening banned doping regulations by conducting drug testing and awareness programmes.

Material agencies under the portfolio are: the Department of Industry, Science and Resources; the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation; the Australian Sports Commission; the Australian Tourist Commission; and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation.

Small agencies under the portfolio are: the Australian Geological Survey Organisation; the Australian Institute of Marine Science; the Australian Sports Drug Agency; IP Australia; and National Standards Commission.

Prime Minister and Cabinet

Table 18: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 18 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio produces a range of outputs directed at achieving well-coordinated, efficient and accountable public administration, supported by a values-based Australian Public Service. The portfolio also seeks to achieve equity for Indigenous Australians in cultural, social and economic terms.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet

Departmental expenses in the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C) rose in 1999-2000, reflecting the costs relating to the referendum held on 6 November 1999.

In the 2000-01 Budget, the Government has provided $16 million in each of 2000-01 and 2001-02 for the planning and staging of the 2001 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Brisbane. An amount of $5 million over two years will be allocated to administered expenses for a contribution to the Queensland Government for general security costs.

Administered expenses also reflect resources currently committed to programs managed by the Office of the Status of Women, including the continuation of the successful Partnerships Against Domestic Violence programme. The administered expenses also provide for the expected costs of litigation regarding the Separated Indigenous Children and the Hindmarsh Island Bridge, and the costs of visiting dignitaries.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission

The steady increase in Departmental expenses for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) primarily reflects funding for the Community Housing and Infrastructure Programme and the Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP) Scheme. In this Budget the Government has provided additional resources to ATSIC to expand the CDEP scheme by 1,425 participant places in addition to the growth of 550 participant places per year provided on an ongoing basis. The participants in the CDEP will also receive compensation under the arrangements included in The New Tax System, equivalent to that provided to people in receipt of income support payments through the Family and Community Services portfolio.

The administered expenses of the Commission reflect the ongoing resourcing arrangements for the Indigenous Land Corporation and the Aboriginal Benefits Account.

Capital Movements

The capital funding for ATSIC, highlighted under the memorandum item in Table 5 above, reflects the provision of an annual capital injection by the Government of approximately $90 million for the Indigenous Land Fund. The establishment of the Indigenous Land Fund forms part of the Government's response to decisions by the High Court of Australia relating to native title. The fund will be built up by a series of capital injections to become a self-sustaining capital fund by 30 June 2004. From that time on, the fund is intended to provide an ongoing and secure source of resources to the Indigenous Land Corporation to assist Indigenous people to buy and manage land in a sustainable manner.

Portfolio Overview

Key policy activities for the portfolio during 2000-01 include taxation reform, the negotiation of further Comprehensive Regional Assessments and Regional Forest Agreements and the Sydney 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Issues related to the status of women, and Aboriginal reconciliation and legislative reform on Indigenous issues, including Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protection Act 1984 also remain key priorities.

The portfolio is also responsible for the planning and staging of the 2001 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Brisbane.

The Department provides economic, social and international policy advice as well as coordination and support services for the Prime Minister, other portfolio Ministers, Cabinet and its Committees.

A range of portfolio bodies, including ATSIC, undertake planning, development and direct delivery of services across a range of activities relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. These are aimed at improving health, education, employment and economic development. A significant proportion of these activities is undertaken in regional and remote Australia.

Material agencies in the portfolio are: the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission.

Small agencies in the portfolio are: the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commercial Development Corporation, Aboriginal Hostels Limited, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Australian National Audit Office, Indigenous Land Corporation, Office of National Assessments, Office of the Commonwealth Ombudsman, Office of the Official Secretary to the Governor General, the Public Service and Merit Protection Commission and the Torres Strait Regional Authority.

Transport and Regional Services

Table 19: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 19 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio delivers transport and regional services which link the Australian community and contribute to its prosperity, accessibility, environmental sustainability and safety.

Trends in Expenses
Department of Transport and Regional Services

Total expenses are expected to decline slightly in real terms in 2000-01, due largely to one-off expenses in 1999-2000 that were associated with the Maritime Industry Finance Company's funding of redundancies, together with some early payments under the roads programme.

Administered expenses are expected to increase in 2001-02, largely as a result of an increase in final year Federation Fund spending, the Mainland Interstate Rail Track upgrade programme and increased road funding associated with Geelong Road ($100 million over 2001-02 and 2002-03). However, other expenses decline from 2000-01 to 2001-02 by about $51 million, mainly due to the finalisation of the expense associated with the Sydney Airport Noise Amelioration programme.

From 2002-03 there are changes in expenses for Grants to States and Territories. These reflect the culmination of $101 million of Federation Fund projects. The Local Government Financial Assistance Grants continue, with nominal increases through to 2003-04 due to the maintenance of payments in real (GST excluded) per capita terms. The ongoing CPI estimate (excluding the estimated impact of indirect tax reform) will be used for indexation purposes. Since government agencies, including local government, are able to claim input tax credits they will not pay GST on their purchases and there is no need to increase funding by the GST factor in the CPI to maintain buying power.

New measures include Year 2002 - Year of the Outback and Adelaide Airport Noise Amelioration. The Adelaide Airport Noise Amelioration programme is expected to cost $10 million in 2000-01, $24 million in 2001-02, $24 million in 2002-03, and $6 million in 2003-04. This cost is to be offset over an 11-year period by the extension of the application of the Aircraft Noise Levy Collection Act (1995) in 2000-01 to jet aircraft landing at Adelaide Airport.

One-off expenses in 1999-2000 associated with the Maritime Industry Finance Company's funding of redundancies is the main cause of movement of expenses on Sea Transport, with ongoing expenses representing continuation of the Bass Strait schemes. Variability in the rail expenses mainly represents payments for the proposed Darwin Alice Springs railway and the Mainland Interstate Rail Track Upgrade. The decline in Air Transport expenses from $101 million to $8 million over the forward estimates primarily reflects one-off payments for Adelaide Airport and Flinders Island Airport together with the completion of the Sydney Airport Noise Amelioration programme.

Expenses are expected to peak in 2001-02 for Road Transport, Urban and Regional Development and Assistance to other Governments. This is the result of one-off funding for Roads of National Importance such as the Geelong Road, maturing of the Rural Transaction Centre Programme and the completion of the Federation Fund programme.

Civil Aviation Safety Authority

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority's (CASA) expenses are expected to decline due to improved operational efficiencies from restructuring, but increase in 2003-04 due to increased depreciation expenses and work-in-progress associated with capital investment, mainly in information technology.

Capital Movements
Department of Transport and Regional Services

The Department will undertake capital expenditure of $22 million in 2000-01 and $69 million over the next four years for capital works projects on Cocos (Keeling) and Christmas Islands. This supports the Government's objective of bringing public infrastructure in the Indian Ocean Territories up to mainland standards, in line with recommendations in the Commonwealth Grants Commission's December 1999 report on the Indian Ocean Territories. The expenditure will be largely internally funded.

Capital appropriations in 1999-2000 and the Budget year include an appropriation of previous years carryovers, an injection to settle land acquisitions for a possible airport at Badgery's Creek, and final equity payments ($4 million in 2000-01) for the Indian Ocean Territories capital works programme that was instituted in previous years.

The Department is yet to finalise a capital asset replacement strategy which, together with the one-off sale of information technology assets associated with outsourcing will contribute to a decrease in net capital investment in the Budget and forward years.

Civil Aviation Safety Authority

CASA will internally fund non-financial asset purchases of $10 million in 2000-01 and, in total, $30 million over the next four years.

Portfolio Overview

The Department of Transport and Regional Services aims to improve the efficiency of transport facilities, including the development of an effective integrated transport system. In particular, the Department strives to enhance regional and remote communities' access to services. The Department also provides regulatory, investigative and safety services to the community and collects revenue from a number of sources on behalf of the Commonwealth.

CASA is responsible for aviation standards, compliance and promotion.

Material agencies under the portfolio are: the Department of Transport and Regional Services; and the Civil Aviation Safety Authority.

Small agencies under the portfolio are: the National Capital Authority; and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority.

Treasury

Table 20: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 20 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio provides policy advice to the Government with the aim of achieving strong, sustainable economic growth and the improved wellbeing of Australians.

Trends in Expenses

Major developments in portfolio expenses and funding relate to the implementation of the Government's tax reform initiatives, and costs associated with conducting the Commonwealth census in 2001. This increase in expenses is offset by changes in the Commonwealth/State financial relations set out in The New Tax System and reductions in public debt interest, reflecting a projected reduction in the Commonwealth's debt.

The increase in expenses between 1999-2000 and 2001-02 in the Treasury portfolio estimates is largely due to the impact of the Government's reforms to the taxation system and Commonwealth-State financial relations.

Treasury

The reduction in expenses is largely due to the changes resulting from The New Tax System. Under the revised arrangements the States and Territories will receive all the revenue from the GST in return for the abolition of Financial Assistance Grants to the States and Territories and the removal of a range of State and Territory taxes. GST revenue will not be shown in budgetary terms as an expense to the Commonwealth as it is considered to be a State tax.

The reduction in expenses is partially offset by increases in grants to balance State and Territory budgets as a result of the amendments to the tax reform programme. These included the GST exemption of basic food and some health and education items. The Commonwealth guarantee that the budgetary position of each State and Territory will be no worse off in the initial years following the introduction of the GST is met by providing budget balancing advances and grants to the States and Territories.

In 2000-01, the Government will establish a non-statutory Board of Taxation to continue the consultative arrangements that commenced in the Review of Business Taxation. The Department of the Treasury will be provided with additional funding of $23 million over four years to administer the board.

Australian Bureau of Statistics

Departmental expenses are projected to increase by approximately $100 million in 2001-02 to cover the cost of conducting the 2001 Census. The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) is receiving additional funding of $11 million over three years to implement the Government's decision to provide a Centenary of Federation gift to the nation in the form of named-identified census information, to be made available to the community in 2100.

Australian Securities and Investments Commission

The Australian Securities and Investments Commission's (ASIC) appropriation and expenses have increased by $13 million per annum as a result of the transfer of responsibility for administering unclaimed moneys for non-bank Authorised Deposit-Taking Institutions (ADIs) from the States and Territories and bank ADIs from the Department of the Treasury.

Australian Taxation Office

Expenses for the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) have largely increased between 1999-2000 and 2000-01 because of the establishment of the Diesel and Alternative Fuels Grants Scheme and the DFRS. Expenses also increased as a result of the introduction of the Fuels Sales Grants Scheme, estimated to cost $490 million over four years. The ATO has also received additional funding from 2000-01 onwards to implement the Business Tax Reforms programme ($44 million over two years), the changes to GST for food, health and education services made GST free in The New Tax System (Goods and Services Tax) Act 1999 ($60 million per annum) and the grants schemes outlined above ($250 million over three years).

Expenses also increase in 2000-01 due to the change in the accounting treatment of the DFRS which is currently shown as an offset to revenue rather than an expense. To improve the transparency of the Commonwealth's financial transactions, from 2000-01 funding for the scheme will now be shown as an expense rather than an offset to revenue. This change in accounting treatment will increase the estimates for taxation revenue and expenses by approximately $2 billion per annum.

Australian Office of Financial Management

The increase in appropriation revenue for the Australian Office of Financial Management (AOFM) is due to the change in accounting treatment of cash flows associated with management of the Commonwealth's debt. This will now be reflected in the AOFM's Statement of Revenue and Expenses rather than as a capital injection in the Statement of Assets and Liabilities, which will improve the transparency of the Commonwealth's financial transactions. AOFM interest and other financing expenses are projected to decline over the forward estimates as the Commonwealth retires debt.

Capital Movements
Treasury

The sharp increase in the Treasury's capital appropriations in 2000-01 relates to the Commonwealth's commitment that the State and Territories will be no worse off under the implementation of The New Tax System. The States and Territories will be advanced $1.7 billion in 2000-01, which will be repayable without interest.

Australian Taxation Office

The Government is providing capital appropriations to the ATO to develop computer software for implementation of the Business Tax Reform measures and the Fuels Sales Grants Scheme.

The reduction in net capital investment in 2002-03 and 2003-04 reflects the acceleration of planned capital investment on computer software during 2000-01 to enable the ATO to deliver A New Tax System - Measures for a Better Environment and Business Tax Reform.

Portfolio Overview

The portfolio includes a number of agencies such as the Royal Australian Mint, the ABS and the ATO. Other bodies monitor and regulate the Australian business community at large. AOFM enhances the Commonwealth's capacity to manage its net debt portfolio.

Material agencies under the portfolio are: the Department of the Treasury; the Australian Bureau of Statistics; the Australian Securities and Investments Commission; the Australian Taxation Office; and the Australian Office of Financial Management.

Small agencies under the portfolio are: the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission; the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority; the Companies and Securities Advisory Committee; the National Competition Council; and the Productivity Commission.

Veterans' Affairs

Table 21: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment(a)

(a) Data in Table 21 relate to material agencies only and due to payments between agencies within the portfolio these numbers should not be added to form a total.
Note: Further information can be obtained from the Portfolio Budget Statement.

Summary of Major Developments in Portfolio Expenses and
Net Capital Investment

The portfolio is responsible for fulfilling Australia's obligations to war veterans and their dependants. It recognises the achievements and sacrifice of those men and women who served Australia and its allies in war, defence and peacekeeping services and ensures that they are acknowledged and commemorated.

Trends in Expenses

Expenses are increasing overall due to the ageing of the veteran population with greater consequent demands on services provided by the Department. The population remains relatively stable as the expected reduction in the number of veterans is offset by an increased number of war widows and widowers.

Expenses have also increased due to the introduction of new measures in the Budget, and with the transfer of responsibility for the administration of the Military Compensation and Rehabilitation Service from the Department of Defence to the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA).

The Commonwealth will incur expenses of $255 million in 2000-01 to support veterans, war widows, widowers and other dependants. Estimates include a four per cent increase in pensions and allowances granted through the implementation of The New Tax System.

Administered expenses relating to compensation and income support are expected to be $5.3 billion in 2000-01. Expenses are expected to remain reasonably stable over the forward years as the expected reduction in the number of service and disability pensioners is countered by an increased number of war widows and widowers and pension increases.

Administered expenses for health and other care services are estimated to increase from $2.8 billion in 2000-01 to around $3.4 billion in 2003-04, mainly due to the ageing of the veteran population.

Following a Review of Service Entitlement Anomalies with Respect to South-East Asian Service 1955-75, the Government will extend repatriation benefits and medals to certain deployments to South-East Asia in the period 1955-75 ($16 million in 2000-01, $36 million in 2001-02, $37 million in 2002-03 and $37 million in 2003-04).

Capital Movements

The Government will provide DVA with a capital injection of $18 million over four years for the Managing Health Care Information Initiative. This injection funds the third and final stage of the development of a comprehensive database on veterans' health care. The initiative will deliver improved management of veterans' health expenditure and improved identification of veterans' health requirements, which will lead to a reduction in expenses over the Budget and forward years.

The Government is also providing DVA a further capital injection of $3 million in 2000-01 for the partial alignment of disability and service pension payments with income support payments through the Change the date of effect for grants and variations to compensation payments measure.

Portfolio Overview

The portfolio ensures that the needs of war veterans, their war widows and widowers and dependants are identified and the veteran community is well informed of services available to them. It provides access to appropriate compensation and income support, health and other care services in recognition of the effects of war service.

Responsibility for the administration of the Military Compensation and Rehabilitation Service, which deals with the claims and rehabilitation services for current and former members of the Australian Defence Force who have been injured in the course of their service, has been transferred to DVA. Funding for the administration of this scheme will be transferred from the Department of Defence.

The Australian War Memorial (AWM) helps Australians to remember, interpret and understand the Australian experience of war and its enduring impact on Australian society. The AWM also maintains war graves in Australia and overseas.

Material agencies under the portfolio: the Department of Veterans' Affairs.

Small agencies under the portfolio: the Australian War Memorial.

Contingency Reserve

Table 22: Summary of Expenses and Net Capital Investment

The Contingency Reserve is the means of ensuring that the aggregate estimates are robust and based on the best information available at the time of publication.

The major components of the Contingency Reserve for the budget and forward estimates include the following:

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